WSN Editorial Board reflects on spring semester events

As we look back on an eventful semester filled with momentous change, the WSN Editorial Board would like to contextualize our recent memories and offer guiding principles for the continued advancement of our country.

The end of April hopefully marks the closing of a dark chapter for the world. In the last few months, we have seen the slightest step toward sensible gun control shut down by Congress, a terrorist attack on our own soil and Syria’s government use chemical weapons to kill countless citizens. On campus, we have watched as two of NYU’s schools held a vote of no confidence against NYU President John Sexton. But as April showers turn to May flowers, our world forges on.

What lessons have we learned as we watched horror and hope unfold around the globe? First, we learned that it has never been more incumbent upon the American citizenry to mobilize and exert its influence over its paralyzed, corrupt government. Congress has dropped all pretenses of political legitimacy and quite obviously panders to the highest bidder. Our elected representatives have deviated from responsibility because we have allowed them to do so. As individuals, we hold little influence over politicians — as a lobby, coalition, political action committee or any other organized body, we can reclaim our rightful clout and restore America’s broken democracy.

We must cease to view the rest of the world as an us-versus-them dynamic. The increasingly interdependent nature of our global system demonstrates every day why American exceptionalism is no longer an adequate justification for unilateralism. As a nation we must adapt to changing world dynamics, and if we do not recognize the new intricacies of international trade, security and aid, we will quickly lose our competitive edge — if we have not lost it already.

Ultimately, we on the Editorial Board are grateful for the opportunity to critically examine the key issues of our time and present a nuanced perspective to our readers. Rather than dictating how you should think, we have tried to emphasize the details of each issue and contribute to the general political discourse that is so essential to a just and righteous society. We encourage you to keep reading, analyzing and contributing — enlightened readers are enlightened citizens, after all.

A version of this article appeared in the Thursday, May 2 print edition. Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com.

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