NYU's Independent Student Newspaper

‘Belle’ falls short of potential

‘Belle’ falls short of potential

May 1, 2014
Filed under ARTS

"Belle” is a remarkable story smothered under layers of costume drama dress-up. The film tells the story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the black, illegitimate daughter of a Navy officer, who was raised by her aristocratic extended family as a free woman in 18th-century England, before the abolition of slavery... Read more »

Firth, Kidman elevate script in ‘Railway Man’

Firth, Kidman elevate script in ‘Railway Man’

April 9, 2014
Filed under ARTS

“The Railway Man” is three different movies bolted together with overtures toward a fourth tacked on at the beginning. There is potential in its premise — a former World War II prisoner of war attempts to track down his tormentor and find peace — and there are isolated moments when the movie w... Read more »

Nathan’s focus proves too wide in ‘12 O’Clock Boys’

Nathan’s focus proves too wide in ‘12 O’Clock Boys’

February 4, 2014
Filed under ARTS

Every day they ride. They speed through city streets, disorienting cars and pedestrians as they weave in and out of traffic. The 12 O’Clock Boys, the titular community of Lotfy Nathan’s debut documentary, are a different kind of gang. They don’t steal, they don’t fight, they don’t vandal... Read more »

Biblical films pay testament to genre’s popularity

Biblical films pay testament to genre’s popularity

January 31, 2014
Filed under ARTS

As blockbusters continue to break Hollywood’s bank accounts, producers scramble to find projects that appeal to the largest possible audience. The latest cash cow seems to be the most revered of texts — the Bible. Four religious-themed films will hit theaters this year, and more are currently in ... Read more »

Documentary examines effects of nuclear impact

Documentary examines  effects of nuclear impact

December 10, 2013
Filed under ARTS

  The Atomic Age was launched into existence with the twin strikes at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which makes it ironic because today Japan is one of the leading users of nuclear power. The tiny island has the third largest number of reactors in the world. Despite the trauma nuclear weapons wrought upon the nation, the la... Read more »

‘S#x Acts’ approaches taboo topic with ambiguity

‘S#x Acts’ approaches taboo topic with ambiguity

December 4, 2013
Filed under ARTS

The pound symbol in the title of Johnathan Gurfinkel’s debut film makes it ambiguous. “S#x Acts” could stand for “Six Acts” or “Sex Acts,” but like most of the movie, the actual meaning is never made clear. It’s actually a moot point — there are sexual acts in the movie, and sur... Read more »

‘Nebraska’ relates raw, character-focused story

‘Nebraska’ relates raw, character-focused story

November 13, 2013
Filed under ARTS

Director Alexander Payne is known for many trends in his films — a complete blend of comedy and drama, a strong grip on human intricacies. But he’s also a native son of the Midwest, with his first three films set in his hometown of Omaha, Neb. “Nebraska” is a homecoming for Payne in more ways th... Read more »

Absorbing documentary ‘Institute’ blends fiction with reality

Absorbing documentary ‘Institute’ blends fiction with reality

October 9, 2013
Filed under ARTS

Spencer McCall’s documentary “The Institute” begins with signs that advertise Jejune Institute and its bizarre inventions of human forcefields and algorithms. The signs appeared all over San Francisco, looking for new recruits for a mysterious organization. Those who answered the advertise... Read more »

‘Blue Caprice’ fails to explore serial killer psychology

‘Blue Caprice’ fails to explore serial killer psychology

September 12, 2013
Filed under ARTS

From “Spring Breakers” to “Pain & Gain” to “The Bling Ring,” 2013 has already seen many films that feature people turning to crime as a way to achieve their American dream. Like “The Bling Ring,” “Blue Caprice” similarly tracks a true crime tale — the 2002 Washington, D.C... Read more »

Documentary explores challenges of Lou Gehrig’s disease

Documentary explores challenges of Lou Gehrig’s disease

September 3, 2013
Filed under ARTS, Editor's Picks

  Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is characterized in the documentary “I Am Breathing” as the last truly incurable disease that still exists today. Those diagnosed suffer from gradual breakdown of the nerves connecting the brain to the muscles, slowly losi... Read more »

‘Spring Breakers’ has shallow humor, lacks depth

‘Spring Breakers’ has shallow humor, lacks depth

March 13, 2013
Filed under ARTS

  Harmony Korine has spent so much time building up his image as a troublemaker that he hasn’t bothered to make any films worth the trouble of seeing. “Gummo” and “Julien Donkey-Boy” are both collections of intentionally shocking sketches, but despite spor-adically arresting im... Read more »

‘War Witch’ portrays haunting exploration of child soldiering in Africa

‘War Witch’ portrays haunting exploration of child soldiering in Africa

February 26, 2013
Filed under ARTS

Movies like “War Witch,” which was nominated for an Oscar for Best Foreign Film, have a specific stigma in theirway. Most audiences don’t want to watch 90 minutes of a young girl forced into becoming a child soldier by rebels in Africa, a continent where between 100,000 to 200,000 children are ... Read more »

Next Page »

NYU's Independent Student Newspaper